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Bariatric Library

Surgical Procedures

Weight loss surgery is one of the most effective treatments for morbid obesity and chronic conditions, including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, fatty liver disease and obstructive sleep apnea.

One of the most important choices when evaluating weight loss surgery is finding the procedure that is right for you and your situation. Our team is here for you every step of the way.

You can compare the most common procedures below, or read a more in depth description of each procedure, where they are listed under the procedures on the left side menu.

The following information provides an overview of the differences between surgical weight loss options. Only you and your surgeon can evaluate the benefits and risks of weight loss surgery and choose the most appropriate procedure for you.

  Gastric Banding Sleeve Gastrectomy Roux-en-Y
  Gastric Banding Sleeve Gastrectomy Roux-en-Y
Procedure description The REALIZE® Adjustable Gastric Band wraps around the upper part of the stomach, dividing the stomach into a small upper pouch that holds about ½ cup of food and a larger lower stomach. The degree of band tightness affects how much food you can eat and the length of time it takes for food to leave the stomach pouch. During the sleeve gastrectomy procedure, a thin vertical sleeve of stomach is created using a stapling device. The sleeve is about the size of a banana. The rest of the stomach is removed. In this procedure, the surgeon creates a small stomach pouch and attaches a section of the small intestine directly to the pouch. This allows food to bypass a portion of the small intestine.
How it works to help you lose weight By creating a smaller stomach pouch, the REALIZE Band limits the amount of food that can be eaten at one time, so you feel full sooner and stay full longer. As you eat less food, your body will stop storing excess calories and start using its fat energy supply. By creating a smaller stomach pouch, a sleeve gastrectomy limits the amount of food that can be eaten at one time, so you feel full sooner and stay full longer. As you eat less food, your body will stop storing excess calories and start using its fat supply for energy. By creating a smaller stomach pouch, a gastric bypass limits the amount of food that can be eaten at one time, so you feel full sooner and stay full longer. By bypassing a portion of the small intestine, it also causes your body to absorb fewer calories. As you eat less food, and absorb fewer calories, your body will stop storing excess calories and start using its fat supply for energy.
How it affects digestion Allows for normal digestion and absorption. Food passes through the digestive tract in the usual order, allowing it to be fully absorbed in the body. Allows for normal digestion and absorption. Food passes through the digestive tract in the usual order, allowing it to be fully absorbed in the body. Changes the body’s normal digestive process to reduce the number of calories and nutrients that are absorbed.

Reversible

Yes No No

Total excess
body weight lost

43% 33% to 85%, with an average of 55% 61.6%

Type 2 diabetes

47.8% resolved1 80.2% resolved or improved3 56% resolved2
37% improved2
83.8% resolved3
90.6% resolved or improved3

High blood pressure resolved

43.2%3 49%2 67.5% 3

High cholesterol resolved

78% improved3 In addition, patients in the U.S. clinical trial experienced a 22% increase in good cholesterol (HDL) 36 months after surgery1 43% resolved2 94.9% improved3

Obstructive sleep apnea resolved

94.6%3 60% resolved2 86.6%3
 

Resolution statistics above reflect observations in the confines of studies; EES has no independent data to suggest permanent resolution.
  1. REALIZE Adjustable Gastric Band: Summary of safety and effectiveness data. Available at: http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/cdrh_docs/pdf7/P070009b.pdf. Accessed on November 11, 2009.
  2. EES summary of data contained in review article: Brethauer SA, Hammel JP, Schauer PR. Systematic review of sleeve gastrectomy as staging and primary bariatric procedure. Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2009;5:469-475.
  3. Buchwald H, Avidor Y, Braunwald E, et al. Bariatric surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA. 2004;292:1724-1737.
  4. Cremieux PY, Buchwald H, Shikora SA, Ghosh A, Yang HE, Buessing M. A study on the economic impact of bariatric surgery. Am J Manag Care. 2008;14:589-596.
  5. Cottam D, Qureshi FG, Mattar SG, et al. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy as an initial weight-loss procedure for high-risk patients with morbid obesity. Surg Endosc. 2006;20:859-863.
  6. Schauer PR, Ikramuddin S, Gourash W, Ramanathan R, Luketich J. Outcomes after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity. Ann Surg. 2000;232:515-529.

Still have questions? Visit our FAQ page, or sign up for a free informational seminar where our surgeons will talk through each of these processes and answer any questions you might have.