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Injuries & Conditions

The hand is involved in almost every activity from the moment we wake until we end our day. We often take our healthy hands for granted. It is when we cannot use our hands that we realize how vital they are each minute of our lives.

Common Hand Problems

While many people may think it would take a traumatic injury to really affect the way they use their hands, common, non-traumatic injuries and conditions can be just as problematic.

Our surgeons handle complex fractures of the hand and injuries to the carpal bones that alter the mechanics of the wrist. Hand surgeons perform a wide variety of operations such as fracture repairs, nerve decompressions, releases, transfer and repairs of tendons and reconstruction of injuries, rheumatoid deformities and hereditary defects.


What is it?
The carpal tunnel is a space in the wrist where a nerve and nine tendons pass from the forearm into the hand. Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs when swelling in the tunnel compresses the median nerve.

What causes it?
It affects anyone who grips something tightly or uses their wrists consistently, such as cashiers, cyclists, meat cutters and musicians; or prolonged use of vibrating equipment, such as a jackhammer.

What are the symptoms?
Tingling, numbness and pain in the thumb, index and middle fingers. These symptoms are usually experienced at night.

How is it treated?
  • Splints or braces to immobilize and rest the wrist
  • Changes to how you perform daily activities
  • Oral anti-inflammatory medications and steroid injections
  • If too severe surgery will involve enlarging the carpal tunnel, which in turn will relieve the swelling and pressure on the nerve.
  • Hand therapy
What is it?
An irritation and swelling of the tunnel that surrounds the thumb tendons as they pass from the wrist to the thumb.

What causes it?
May be caused by overuse, repetitive motion, pregnancy and rheumatoid arthritis.

What are the symptoms?
Twinges of pain at the base of the thumb or the thumb side of the wrist. Pain is usually worse when forcefully grasping things or lifting items such as a gallon of milk.

How is it treated?
  • Splints
  • Oral anti-inflammatory medications or injections
  • Temporary avoidance of activities that cause pain
  • For those cases that do not respond, surgery may be recommended. The procedure enlarges the tendon compartment to make more room for the irritated tendon.
  • Hand therapy
What is it?
An abnormal thickening of the tissue between the skin and the tendons in the palm. This may limit the use of fingers and cause the fingers to be pulled in toward the palm.

What causes it?
This condition is hereditary and the cause is not known. It is more common in men over the age of 50. The disease appears later in women.

What are the symptoms?
A small lump or nodule in the palm, occurring many times in the crease of the hand.

How is it treated?
Surgery will only temporarily restore use to the fingers. Your doctor will discuss recommendations with you. Hand therapy may be recommended with or without surgery.

What is it?
Lumps in the hand. They form when tissues surrounding certain joints become inflamed and swell up. They are not tumors or cancer.

What causes it?
Sometimes associated with rheumatoid arthritis or excessive overuse of joints in the wrist and fingers.

What are the symptoms?
Lumps appear and they will most likely be very painful. Pain will increase with extended use of the hand, and range of motion may be restricted. They often change in size and may disappear completely.

How is it treated?
  • Monitoring the cysts for changes
  • Splint to immobilize the hand, fingers or wrist
  • Remove fluid from the cyst with a needle.
  • If non-surgical treatments are not successful, surgery to remove the cyst may be recommended.
What is it?
A condition of burning pain, stiffness, swelling, sweating and discoloration of the hand or arm that may become disabling. If not treated, it can cause stiffness and loss of use of the affected part of the arm.

What causes it?
It may follow a sprain, fracture, injury to nerves or blood vessels, or the symptoms may appear after a surgery. Other causes include pressure on a nerve, infection, cancer, neck disorders, stroke, or heart attack.

What are the symptoms?
Acute: May last up to three months. Symptoms include pain and swelling, increased warmth and redness in the affected part/limb and excessive sweating.

Dystrophic: Can last three to 12 months. Swelling is more constant, skin wrinkles disappear, skin temperature becomes cooler, and fingernails become brittle. Pain is more widespread.

Atrophic: Lasts one year or more. The skin of the affected area is now pale, dry, tightly stretched and shiny. The area is stiff, pain may decrease, and the chance of getting motion back is decreased.

How is it treated?
  • Medication
  • Physical or occupational therapy
  • Surgery
What is it?
The muscles located in the hand and forearm that control the bending or flexing of the fingers.

What causes it?
Deep cuts on the palm side of the wrist, hand, or fingers. When a tendon is cut, the ends pull away from each other causing a rubber band effect.

What are the symptoms?
When a tendon has only been partially cut, fingers may still bend, but it will be painful and the tendon may eventually rupture. When both tendons are cut completely through, the finger joints cannot bend.

How is it treated?
Most likely surgery to repair your cut tendon will be required. After four to six weeks, the fingers are allowed to move slowly and without resistance. Healing will take approximately three months after the repair.

Therapy is an important part of treatment. In most cases, full and normal movement of the injured area does not return after surgery. Therapy can help to loosen up the scar tissue and prevent it from interfering with the finger's movement.

What is it?
Inflammation of the tendon fibers that attach the forearm muscles to the outside of the elbow.

What causes it?
Inflammation of the tendon fibers that attach the forearm muscles to the outside of the elbow.

What are the symptoms?
Pain near the bone on the outer side of the elbow. The area is usually tender to the touch and uncomfortable when gripping.

What is it?
Tendons in the hand that control the bending of your finger become swollen. The swelling causes pressure to build up in the sheath and a knot or nodule is formed.

What causes it?
Possible causes include rheumatoid arthritis, gout or diabetes. Occupations requiring repetitive bending of the finger may increase the risk of developing this problem.

What are the symptoms?
Symptoms include soreness at the base of the finger, painful clicking or snapping when attempting to flex or extended the affected finger. In more severe cases, the affected finger will lock in a flexed or extended position.



Locations

Hand and Orthopedic Center

1997 Miamisburg-Centerville
Centerville, OH 45459
P: (937) 401-6003

? Miles Away

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